Where is Point Nepean?

Point Nepean marks the southern point of the beautiful Mornington Peninsula and the eastern entrance to Port Phillip Bay. It has a rich history and played an important role in shaping the early settlement, quarantine and defence of Victoria.

My family and I had a recent power-break weekend away where we stayed at the very comfortable Oceanic Apartments in Sorrento and spent the Sunday exploring Point Nepean. We were extremely fortunate with the weather given it is still winter but the sun did shine and only a gentle breeze meant it was very pleasant walking weather.

Point Nepean, Mornington Peninsula

We parked the car near Gunners Cottage and walked from Point Nepean Cemetery, Observation Point, Cheviot Hill Stop to Fort Pearce where we boarded the bus to the Fort Nepean. (Our feet had had enough walking!). We passed pristine beaches (above) and reminders of the war history of the area (below). The sign on the gate is a warning for unexploded bombs beyond!

War history reminders at Point Nepean

We spent a good hour at Fort Nepean exploring the military forts and tunnels and the photo below is showing the very tip of the peninsula, the heads (opening to Port Phillip Bay) out to Point Lonsdale in the distance.

The Heads at Point Nepean

Lonely Planet East Coast Australia (Travel Guide)

Map

TravelTipsPlus Google Map of Point Nepean

One Great Reason to Visit Point Nepean

One great reason to visit this travel destination is for the stunning views across the bay to Queenscliff, Point Lonsdale and the heads.

Point Nepean by Cycle Atlas

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Where is Karumba?

Karumba is a small community 70km north from Normanton, Queensland and lies on the Gulf of Carpentaria at the mangrove-fringed mouth of the Norman River. It’s main attraction is fishing for barramundi, prawns and crab-fishing. The Barramundi Discovery Centre is well worth a visit. It breeds barramundi fingerlings through each wet season which are then released to restock Gulf waterways and rivers which is critical if we are to have ‘Fish for a fishing Future’. With fishing tourism being the main attraction there are plenty of opportunities to hire your own boat (boat licence required) or catch a fishing charter.

Karumba is also known for its spectacular sunsets which can be viewed from boat or Karumba Point Beach. These photos below were taken from Travel Tips Plus reader Jane. Jane and her husband are currently on a great adventure trooping around Australia with their gorgeous dog Mac.

Sunset at Karumba

 

Karumba sunset

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TravelTipsPlus Google Map of Karumba

Karumba, Australian Travel Video Guide

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Argos Hotel – A hidden gem

Back during 1996 I found myself travelling to Turkey, alone. I was away for a period of 3 weeks. After arriving in Istanbul, I headed south through Ankara and down to the coast. I spent a few days longer than I wished to in Antalya after getting caught up in a bus strike and I couldn’t get out. Well, that’s a whole other story – full of adventure!

During my meanderings through the streets and laneways of Antalya, I came across the hidden, boutique Argos Hotel. The afternoon sun was getting hot and I longed for a little bit of comfort – I had been staying at a cheaper pension. I decided to be cheeky and ask if I could, for a small fee, spend the afternoon by their pool and promised I’d buy a couple of drinks. :)

They kindly allowed this and after settling on a poolside lounge I settled in for the most gorgeous afternoon. There were few others around probably opting for local tours. So it’s nearly 20 years since I’ve been there and I wondered if it was still operating. A little Google search quickly confirmed it is!

The Argos Hotel, Antalya, Turkey

A scanned business card I kept

 

poolside at the Argos Hotel

I had the pool almost all to myself!

 

Antalya door

A typical door – Antalya, Turkey

Argos Hotel, Antalya

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Travel insurance tips for seniorsWorking out which travel insurance is right for you can be a challenge, and when it comes to seniors travel insurance it gets even more complicated.

Older Australians are travelling more than ever before, but they have several extras to consider, with insurers setting different criteria depending on your age and pre-existing medical conditions.

If you are over a certain age, some travel insurance policies may only cover you for a particular length of time overseas – such as three months – so it’s a good idea to check the fine print.

It’s very important for seniors to compare travel insurance policies – especially those aged over 75 who don’t require any medication.

Travel insurance tips

NRMA Travel Insurance spokesman Maureen Mullins says seniors should buy travel insurance at the same time they book their trip so you are covered from day dot if you need to cancel.

Also be upfront about existing medical conditions.

“There are many conditions that are automatically included and some that need to be assessed,” she says.

Cruising is one of the most popular forms of travel for older Australians, but most on-board medical services are not covered by Medicare, so you will need travel insurance even if you are only cruising in Australian waters.

Ms Mullins also says you should leave a copy of your travel documents and itinerary with a friend or relative in Australia, and also keep a copy of your policy emergency numbers and travel documents with you.

It’s a good idea to visit your GP to discuss your travel plans before you book, and again for a general check-up before you leave to make sure regular vaccinations, such as the flu shot and tetanus, are up to date.

If you are taking medication with you, get a list from your doctor saying their generic names, dosages and how often you take them. Get a couple of copies and keep one separate from your main luggage.

Read your Product Disclosure Statement

The Insurance Council of Australia’s financial literacy program Understand Insurance says it’s important to compare products and features between companies, not just price.

“Most travel insurance policies have age limits or restrictions, but several travel insurers offer policies specially designed for retirees or senior travellers,” a spokesman says.

Make sure you let your insurer know if your health circumstances change before you head off on your holiday.

In certain countries, including the US, Japan and throughout Europe, it’s important to have unlimited hospital and medical cover.

It’s essential to read your Product Disclosure Statement and check you are covered for full medical evacuation in case you have to be flown home in an emergency.

Australia has reciprocal healthcare agreements for seniors with some countries, including the United Kingdom, New Zealand, Italy, the Netherlands, Sweden, Finland, Norway and the Republic of Ireland, which means emergency care is available.

But you still need to get travel insurance. It’s also a good idea to check with Medicare for the latest information on countries participating in reciprocal healthcare agreements

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